New Stedelijk Museum

by | 18. Oct 2012

Cultural | Extention/ redesign | Feature

Photo John Lewis Marshall

 

Against the backdrop of the old building, the white synthetic volume is the new image of the Stedelijk Museum.

Although the new building is unmistakably different in appearance from the original Stedelijk Museum designed by A.W. Weissman, it matches the scale of the 1895 building and has a direct connection to it on all floors. The two are fully integrated without either one being compromised.

Photo John Lewis Marshall

 

The existing building is left almost entirely intact and in full view by lifting part of the new volume into space and sinking the rest underground. Already known by the nickname “the bathtub,” this smooth white volume, supported by white columns, has a seamless construction of reinforced fibre and a roof jutting far into space.

Photo John Lewis Marshall

 

The main entrance has been moved to the open expanse of the Museumplein (Museum Plaza), creating an active, common ground for the first time among the Stedelijk Museum, the Van Gogh Museum, the Rijksmuseum and the Concertgebouw.

Once past the entrance, visitors can choose whether to pass directly into the original building, or take the stairs or elevator to the new building’s exhibition galleries.

All the public functions, the knowledge center, museum shop and restaurant are located in the large open, transparent space where the plaza floor continues to the outside of the existing building.

Photo John Lewis Marshall

 

Photo John Lewis Marshall

The lower level houses the largest free-span exhibition gallery in the Netherlands as well as a large black-box gallery/performance space. The other galleries are on
the second floor.

To allow visitors to enjoy exhibitions without distractions anĀ  escalator enclosed in a yellow “tube,” runs directly between the lower level and the second floor.

Photo John Lewis Marshall

 

Photo John Lewis Marshall

Photo John Lewis Marshall

Photo John Lewis Marshall

The detailing and color in the interior of the two buildings is in alignment, making the contrast between the old and new building barely noticeable when walking through the museum.

The Stedelijk Museum of Willem Sandberg, the director who put the museum on the international map, was our starting point. Sandberg stripped the interior of decoration and had it painted white, creating a neutral background for art. Our plan for the exterior is based on retaining the 19th-century architecture, adding 21st-century technology and painting everything in Sandberg white.
/Mels Crouwel

Celebrated for its majestic staircase, grand rooms and natural lighting, the Weissman building is reinstated in its former glory as it embarks on a new life; under one roof with the new addition.

Image courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenPerspective Section

 

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenSite Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenGround Level Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenFirst Floor Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenSecond Floor Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenBasement Level One Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenBasement Level Two Plan

Drawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenLongitudinal SectionDrawing courtesy Benthem Crouwel ArchitektenCross Section





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CITY Amsterdam
COUNTRY The Netherlands

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