Stanislavsky Center

by | 26. Jul 2012

Cultural | Feature | Mixed use | Residential
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Photo: Thomas Mayer

 

The Stanislavsky Center project consists of the conversion of a series of historic buildings into a mixed-use business and cultural complex, with a significant new residential component.

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

The building types range from brick-built 19th century factories, to mid-20th century concrete framed industrial buildings, and the original faux classical Stanislavsky family buildings that are being transformed into a hotel and restaurant complex.

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

The street-facing factories have been refaced using either terra cotta tiles, in a graphic application that follows the rhythm of the original brick facades, or re-bricked to accentuate the vertical detail of the facade.

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

The 20th century buildings have been given different treatments relating to their new mixed uses: some have been stripped back to their heavy frames and given smoothly rendered facades; others have terra cotta facades; and one, in perhaps the most radical treatment, has a sheer glass facade through which the original concrete floor plates can be clearly seen.

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

The interiors are colorful and contemporary with many original details.

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

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Photo: Thomas Mayer

The original theater built by actor Konstantin Stanislavsky, son of the original owner of the complex, has been refurbished to become the focal point of cultural activity within the mixed-use development.

The scheme as a whole is bound together by the architect’s landscape scheme, which uses rows of specimen trees and inscriptions of paving that give structure to the site’s vast internal “courtyard,” linking it seamlessly to its car parking areas.

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Rendering courtesy John McAslan + Partners

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Rendering courtesy John McAslan + Partners

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Rendering courtesy John McAslan + Partners

 

INFORMATION

CITY Moscow
COUNTRY Russia
CONSTRUCTION YEAR 2008
ARCHITECT John McAslan + Partners

CLIENT

CONTRACTOR

PUBLISHER