Stone Hill Center

by | 20. Aug 2012

Cultural | Feature
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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

 

The Stone Hill Center fulfills the Clark’s dual role as a public art museum and a major academic and research center.

The design unifies the existing buildings and reorient them to the natural landscape, emphasizing  the Clark’s unique art-in-nature experience and  continuing the Institute’s tradition of preserving its 140-acre site.

The design consists of three rectangular elements, united by a wall that extends both above and below ground. Visitors enter the pavilion from a path set along the stone wall, which directs them to the entrance and views of the campus, revealed as they approach.

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

 

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

 

The two-story rectangular structure of glass and granite, has an outdoor terrace and below grade courtyards. The building has open views of the landscape on all floors.

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

 

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

 

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Photo courtesy of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute © Jeff Goldberg / Esto

 

Landscape architects Reed Hilderbrand’s approach to the project has taken into account the cultural history of the site as well as its views, character, and wetlands. The plan for the landscape portion of the project will enable the Clark to continue to manage the woodlands and fields for diversity and augment the site’s beauty and pristine qualities.

At the heart of the site is a new one-and-a-half acre reflecting pool which will be visible from all three buildings and provide a central, unifying point for the whole campus. The four-inch deep pool will be a cool spot for visitors in the summer, and in the winter will be frozen for ice skating, adding another outdoor activity for the community.

A centerpiece of the expansion and campus enhancement is the reaffirmation of the original 1955 white marble building as central to the visitor experience.  Designed by the late Daniel Perry under founder Sterling Clark’s close supervision, the building is a neo-classical “temple of art,” with intimate galleries.

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Drawing courtesy the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

 

INFORMATION

CITY Williamstown, Massachusetts
COUNTRY USA
CONSTRUCTION YEAR 2008
ARCHITECT Tadao Ando Architect & Associates
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT Reed Hilderbrand Associate

CLIENT

CONTRACTOR

PUBLISHER